Posts tagged "Northern California Super Lawyers"

Robert H. Haggard and His Lifelong Love of Sailing

Robert H. Haggard, partner at The Van Winkle Law Firm in Asheville and in Hendersonville, spoke with us for a Q&A in the 2012 edition of North Carolina Super Lawyers, but not all of our conversation could fit into our print edition. Here, in an exclusive excerpt for the blog, Haggard talks about his interest in sailing and how that interest came about:

San Francisco Civil Rights Lawyer Robert Rubin on the Reality of the Illegal Immigrant

Last year we interviewed Robert Rubin, litigation director of the Lawyers' Committee for Civil Rights of the San Francisco Bay Area, and the resulting profile, "Remembering the St. Louis," appeared in the 2010 issue of Northern California Super Lawyers magazine. Rubin was such a fascinating interview, however, that we couldn't fit it all in. Here's part of what was left out.

Christopher Dolan and the question of gender in women's golf

Professional golfer Lana Lawless is physically and legally a woman; it says so right on her birth certificate. But she didn't used to be. She had sexual reassignment surgery in 2005, and at some tournaments, which have new rules requiring that competitors be "born female," this has been a point of controversy.

The lawyers arguing the historic Wal-Mart Case

The largest employment discrimination case in U.S. history, involving more than a million women accusing Wal-Mart Stores of unfair pay and promotions, could face the Supreme Court nearly a decade after the suit was filed. This case of national significance for class action law is being handled on all sides by attorneys selected to Super Lawyers lists. Theodore Boutrous Jr. (Southern California Super Lawyers, 2005 to 2010) represents Wal-Mart. Joseph Sellers (Washington DC Super Lawyers, 2007 to 2010) and Brad Seligman (Northern California Super Lawyers, 2005 to 2009) are among the lawyers representing the plaintiffs. Wal-Mart is asking the Supreme Court to review whether the suit should have involved individual filings rather than proceeding as a class action lawsuit, which could cost the retail giant more than $1 billion in damages.