August Super Lawyers Magazine Review

With August ending we wanted to take a look back at the two magazines released this month: 2015 Northern California Super Lawyers Magazine and 2015 Upstate New York Super Lawyers Magazine.

2015 Northern California Super Lawyers Magazine

NXSLRS15_SM_Cover.pngThis issue's cover story features six attorneys who started their careers in the 1950s and '60s. Through a series of questions the lawyers share how they began practicing law, changes they have seen in the industry, and interesting cases they have tried in their lengthy careers. Each has a different opinion on what they think will be the future of the profession, but they all can agree that there will be change.

Next this edition features is Attorney Annette Hurst. Over the past 25 years Hurst has forged a reputation as one of the best copyright and intellectual property lawyers in the country. In 2012, she represented Brocade in a case that resulted in a $112 million verdict in Brocade's favor. "She has a unique sixth sense about how to go for the jugular in a cross examination in a very transparent way" says her former colleague Mark Flagel. Drawing on her roots in the feminist movement, Hurst says her most proud victory came against Mattell Inc. The results of the trial have forced Mattell to back off their protection of Barbie and opened up space for commentary on the famed doll.

2015 Upstate New York Super Lawyers Magazine

NUSLRS15_SM_Cover.pngOur cover story features attorney Ginger Schröder. Schröder began her career working a white-shoe firm in New York City. After realizing the big city life wasn't for her, she escaped to Buffalo where she soon cofounded firm Schröder, Joseph & Associates. Drawing off of her negative experiences at a big firm, she sought to create a non-traditional working environment. Employees aren't expected to wear suits and it's not expected that they come in on the weekends. Today you can find Schröder escaping to her 1,800-sq. ft. Amish built cabin in Farmersville, New York.

Next scientific misconduct attorney Barry Nelson is featured in a Q/A. Originally a criminal defense lawyer, Nelson was brought in on a case in involving scientific misconduct - which is defined as any publication or study in which scientists are accused of fraud in relation to their studies. Having now defended universities such as Columbia, Harvard, the University of California, and multiple cases in the SUNY system, Nelson hasn't looked back.

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